Volume 4, Issue 2, December 2020, Page: 18-21
Expression of CPLX1 in Different Degrees of Spinal Cord Injury in Subacute Stage
Xinhua Xi, Department of Orthopaedics, Yuebei People's Hospital Affiliated to Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, China
Zhisheng Ji, Department of Orthopedics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Yongzheng Bao, Department of Orthopaedics, Yuebei People's Hospital Affiliated to Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, China
Xueren Zhong, Department of Orthopaedics, Yuebei People's Hospital Affiliated to Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, China
Junjian Liao, Department of Orthopaedics, Yuebei People's Hospital Affiliated to Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, China
Qiang Wu, Department of Orthopaedics, Yuebei People's Hospital Affiliated to Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, China
Hongsheng Lin, Department of Orthopedics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Received: Jun. 18, 2020;       Accepted: Jul. 2, 2020;       Published: Jul. 6, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijn.20200402.11      View  214      Downloads  42
Abstract
This study is to explore the expression of CPLX1 (Complexin 1) in spinal cord tissues with different degrees of injury in the subacute phase of spinal cord injury. Twenty-four SD rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups (light, medium and severe injury) and a sham-operated control group. The experimental group made acute spinal cord injury models according to the lisa method, and the spinal cord tissue were collected 72 hours after injury. The tissues of rats were taken for transcriptome high-throughput sequencing and proteomic analysis experiments to observe the expression of CPLX1 in the different degrees during the subacute phase of spinal cord injury. The mRNA and protein of CPLX1 were detect in rat spinal cord tissue, and they were expressed high in the sham operation group. The protein expression in the light injury group began to decrease, and with the increase of the degree of injury, the transcription level of CPLX1 and the amount of protein expression also gradually decreased. The change trend of mRNA transcription level and protein expression level was basically the same. When the spinal cord injury heavier, the less CPLX1 was expressed, the two showed a significant negative correlation. In the subacute stage of spinal cord injury, the translation and protein levels of CPLX1 decreased significantly. The more severe the injury, the lower the transcription level and protein expression level. CPLX1 may be used as a marker gene for the severity of spinal injury.
Keywords
CPLX1, Spinal Cord Injury, Subacute Phase, Degree of Injury
To cite this article
Xinhua Xi, Zhisheng Ji, Yongzheng Bao, Xueren Zhong, Junjian Liao, Qiang Wu, Hongsheng Lin, Expression of CPLX1 in Different Degrees of Spinal Cord Injury in Subacute Stage, International Journal of Neurosurgery. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2020, pp. 18-21. doi: 10.11648/j.ijn.20200402.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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